Yellowstone closes ALL entrances due to ‘unprecedented’ flooding


All entrances to Yellowstone National Park were shut down on Monday to visitors after ‘unprecedented’ levels of rain caused flooding, power outages, rockslides and mudslides. 

A bridge at Rescue Creek in the park was destroyed due to the rainfall, while a number of roads were washed out following devastating mudslides caused by the severe weather.

The park said in a statement: ‘Effective immediately, all entrances to Yellowstone National Park are temporarily CLOSED due to substantial flooding, rockslides and mudslides on roadways from recent unprecedented amounts of rainfall and flooding.’

The statement added: ‘With additional rainfall forecasted, the park does not want large numbers of day-use visitors stranded in the park.’

In a separate statement the National Park Service said that the flooding is ‘beyond record levels.’

Yellowstone National Park is located primarily in Wyoming but stretches into Montana and Idaho as well. It is perhaps most famous for its geysers, including Old Faithful. 

In June 2019, the final year prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, the park saw over 780,000 visitors.  

The park’s entrances will remain closed through until Wedneday

The bridge at Rescue Creek in the park after being washed out

The bridge at Rescue Creek in the park after being washed out

The National Park Service said that the flooding is 'beyond record levels'

The National Park Service said that the flooding is ‘beyond record levels’

Yellowstone National Park is located primarily in Wyoming but stretches into Montana and Idaho too. Most famous for its geysers, most notably, Old Faithful

Yellowstone National Park is located primarily in Wyoming but stretches into Montana and Idaho too. Most famous for its geysers, most notably, Old Faithful

The statement from Yellowstone said that visitors will not be allowed access until 'conditions stabilize and the park can assess damage to roads and bridges and other facilities'

The statement from Yellowstone said that visitors will not be allowed access until ‘conditions stabilize and the park can assess damage to roads and bridges and other facilities’

The National Weather Services’ Jason Straub said that a water gauge in the Lamar River in the northern section of Yellowstone is measuring the water at 16.7 feet – 4.5 feet above the highest previously recorded level, reports the Wyoming Tribune Eagle.  

The park will remain closed on Tuesday and Wednesday at a minimum. The statement from Yellowstone said that visitors will not be allowed access until ‘conditions stabilize and the park can assess damage to roads and bridges and other facilities.’

According to the National Weather Service, scattered snow showers and rain are expected in Yellowstone on Tuesday with a total snow accumulation of half an inch possible along with thunderstorms. By Wednesday, the forecast is ‘mostly sunny’ with a high of 65F. By Friday, the high is expected to be close to 90F. 

More rain and thunderstorms are predicted for Saturday through Monday. 

According to the National Weather Service, scattered snow showers and rain are expected in Yellowstone on Tuesday with a total snow accumulation of half an inch possible along with thunderstorms

According to the National Weather Service, scattered snow showers and rain are expected in Yellowstone on Tuesday with a total snow accumulation of half an inch possible along with thunderstorms

A statement from Yellowstone said that visitors will not be allowed access until 'conditions stabilize and the park can assess damage to roads and bridges and other facilities

 A statement from Yellowstone said that visitors will not be allowed access until ‘conditions stabilize and the park can assess damage to roads and bridges and other facilities

According to the National Water Service, by 10:45 a.m. between 0.75 and 1.75 inches of rain had already fallen in the area

According to the National Water Service, by 10:45 a.m. between 0.75 and 1.75 inches of rain had already fallen in the area

Rockslides shown here as a result of the mass flooding in Yellowstone

Rockslides shown here as a result of the mass flooding in Yellowstone 

Yellowstone Superintendent Cam Sholly described the community of Gardiner as being 'isolated'

Yellowstone Superintendent Cam Sholly described the community of Gardiner as being ‘isolated’

Elizabeth Aluck, a resident of Gardiner, Montana - which is located at the north end of the park - told CNN: 'The river has never been this high'

Elizabeth Aluck, a resident of Gardiner, Montana – which is located at the north end of the park – told CNN: ‘The river has never been this high’

Officials in Gallatin County, which is located northwest of the park, said in a statement: 'This water is moving very fast, is very cold, has large amounts of debris, and is extremely dangerous. Please stay away from the water!'

Officials in Gallatin County, which is located northwest of the park, said in a statement: ‘This water is moving very fast, is very cold, has large amounts of debris, and is extremely dangerous. Please stay away from the water!’

Around 56 employees at the Stillwater Mine in Nye, Montana, north east of Yellowstone were unable to leave due to a sinkhole that opened up due to flooding in the Stillwater River

Around 56 employees at the Stillwater Mine in Nye, Montana, north east of Yellowstone were unable to leave due to a sinkhole that opened up due to flooding in the Stillwater River

Around 56 employees at the Stillwater Mine in Nye, Montana, north east of Yellowstone were unable to leave due to a sinkhole that opened up due to flooding in the Stillwater River. 

The staff are safe and are even providing shelter for some campers who were stranded due to the flooding, KTVQ reports.  

Elizabeth Aluck, a resident of Gardiner, Montana, which is located at the north end of the park,  told CNN:  ‘The river has never been this high before my house.’ Aluck went on to say that it was impossible for her to evacuate because of the flood levels on the roads. 

Yellowstone Superintendent Cam Sholly described the community of Gardiner as being ‘isolated.’ Sholly added: ‘We are working with the county and State of Montana to provide necessary support to residents, who are currently without water and power in some areas,’ according to the Wyoming Tribune Eagle. 

The original warning from Yellowstone officials came early on Monday morning and only applied to the northern entrance to the park. According to the National Water Service, by 10:45 a.m. between 0.75 and 1.75 inches of rain had already fallen in the area. 

Later in the day, it was extended through all entrances. 

Visitors in the northern part of the park were evacuated on Monday morning. 

Officials in Gallatin County, which is located northwest of the park, said in a statement: ‘This water is moving very fast, is very cold, has large amounts of debris, and is extremely dangerous. Please stay away from the water!’

The Park County Sheriff’s Office described the weather system as creating ‘extraordinary run off and flooding,’ in part due to rain falling on snow in the park. 

A flood warning in Fremont County in southeastern Idaho, 25 miles west of Yellowstone’s northern entrance, will remain in place until Wednesday. 

Fremont County Emergency Management Coordinator Keith Richey told East Idaho News: ‘This is the worst overflowing we’ve had. We get this every couple of years but this is the worst that we’ve had. Fremont County has staged sand and sandbags at the Shotgun Bar for those experiencing flooding in the area.’  

Those planning to visit Yellowstone in the coming weeks are asked to constantly check road conditions. 



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.