Triple-I Blog | Report: Traditional Reinsurance Capital Declining


By Max Dorfman, Research Writer, Triple-I

A recent AM Best report finds that traditional reinsurance capital will decrease by approximately $40 billion by the end of 2022, lowering the total to $435 billion. This 8.4 percent decline comes after substantial increases of 15.5 percent for 2019, 8.9 percent for 2020, and 10.7 percent in 2021. The figure incorporates the upturn of the underwriting market and the downturn of the capital and investment markets, with continued geopolitical unrest and the possible decline in global GDP also considered. 

“With interest rates on the rise and equity markets declining, we do anticipate a rather substantial mark-to-market loss in traditional reinsurance capital levels,” said Dan Hofmeister, Senior Financial Analyst at AM Best. Reinsurance capital, working in the opposite direction, has been boosted by underwriting results in spite of heightened catastrophe loss activity in the first half of the year, he said.

Additionally, the report includes a 10-year record of third-party reinsurance capital levels and a prediction that overall third-party capital will remain stable at approximately $95 billion for 2022 compared to $94 billion in 2021.

With traditional and third-party capital together, the report predicts a 6.7 percent decrease in reinsurance capital from both sources, which would constitute the first decline in a decade, as recorded by AM Best.

Florida is emblematic of these struggles

Declines in the U.S. equity market have created capital supply challenges for some insurance-linked securities funds. However, the AM Best report stated that the pullback of traditional reinsurance in catastrophe-exposed markets like Florida could create opportunities for Insurance-Linked Security (ILS) funds. The report states that ILS funds can take advantage of significant price increases and tighter terms and conditions, if traditional capacity is restricted.

Still, Florida continues to be a hotspot for property/casualty losses, with the Triple-I finding that the state’s insurance marketplace has been beset by severe levels of fraud and litigation, driving the homeowner’s insurance market’s crisis in the state. The analysis concluded that the annual cost of an average Florida homeowners insurance policy could increase to $4,231 in 2022.

Reinsurance capital then provides a significant proportion of these costs that are directed to attorney fees and adjusting firms. Additionally, fraud related to roof replacement claims and other construction related matters continue to increase the reinsurance bill in Florida.

“Floridians pay the highest homeowners insurance premiums in the nation for reasons having little to do with their exposure to hurricanes,” said Sean Kevelighan, CEO of Triple-I.

With the threat of decreased capital for reinsurers and the markets in places like Florida experiencing turmoil, reinsurers are actively reviewing their strategy.



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